Jürgen Klopp

Jürgen Klopp, Liverpool vs. Chelsea, UEFA Super Cup 2019-08-14 04.jpg

Klopp with Liverpool at the 2019 UEFA Super Cup

Personal information
Full name Jürgen Norbert Klopp[1]
Date of birth 16 June 1967 (age 55)[2]
Place of birth Stuttgart, West Germany
Height 1.91 m (6 ft 3 in)[3]
Position(s)
  • Striker
  • Defender
Team information

Current team

Liverpool (manager)
Youth career
1972–1983 SV Glatten
1983–1987 TuS Ergenzingen
Senior career*
Years Team Apps (Gls)
1987 1. FC Pforzheim
1987–1988 Eintracht Frankfurt II
1988–1989 Viktoria Sindlingen
1989–1990 Rot-Weiss Frankfurt 0 (0)
1990–2001 Mainz 05 325 (52)
Managerial career
2001–2008 Mainz 05
2008–2015 Borussia Dortmund
2015– Liverpool
*Club domestic league appearances and goals

Jürgen Norbert Klopp (German pronunciation: [ˈjʏʁɡn̩ ˈklɔp] (listen); born 16 June 1967) is a German professional football manager and former player who is the manager of Premier League club Liverpool. He is widely regarded as one of the best managers in the world.[4][5][6][7]

Klopp spent most of his playing career at Mainz 05. He was initially deployed as a striker, but was later moved to defence. Upon retiring in 2001, Klopp became the club’s manager, and secured Bundesliga promotion in 2004. After suffering relegation in the 2006–07 season and unable to achieve promotion, Klopp resigned in 2008 as the club’s longest-serving manager. He then became manager of Borussia Dortmund, guiding them to the Bundesliga title in 2010–11, before winning Dortmund’s first-ever domestic double during a record-breaking season.[note 1] Klopp also guided Dortmund to a runner-up finish in the 2012–13 UEFA Champions League before leaving in 2015 as their longest-serving manager.

Klopp was appointed manager of Liverpool in 2015. He has guided the club to UEFA Champions League finals in 2018 and 2022, and won the trophy in 2019 to secure his first – and Liverpool’s sixth – title in the competition. Klopp’s side finished second in the 2018–19 Premier League, registering 97 points; the then third-highest total in the history of the English top division, and the most by a team without winning the title. The following season, Klopp won the UEFA Super Cup and Liverpool’s first FIFA Club World Cup, before delivering Liverpool’s first Premier League title,[8][9] amassing a club record 99 points and breaking a number of top-flight records. These achievements won him back-to-back FIFA Coach of the Year awards in 2019 and 2020.

Klopp is a notable proponent of Gegenpressing, whereby the team, after losing possession, immediately attempts to win back possession, rather than falling back to regroup. He has described his sides as playing “heavy metal” football, in reference to their pressing and high attacking output. Klopp has cited his main influences as Italian coach Arrigo Sacchi, and former Mainz coach Wolfgang Frank. The importance of emotion is something Klopp has underlined throughout his managerial career, and he has gained both admiration and notoriety for his enthusiastic touchline celebrations.

Early life and playing career

Born in Stuttgart,[10] the state capital of Baden-Württemberg, to Elisabeth and Norbert Klopp, a travelling salesman and a former goalkeeper,[11][12][13] Klopp grew up in the countryside in the Black Forest village of Glatten near Freudenstadt with two older sisters.[10][13][14] He started playing for local club SV Glatten and later TuS Ergenzingen as a junior player,[13] with the next stint at 1. FC Pforzheim and then at three Frankfurt clubs, Eintracht Frankfurt II, Viktoria Sindlingen and Rot-Weiss Frankfurt during his adolescence.[15] Introduced to football through his father, Klopp was a supporter of VfB Stuttgart in his youth.[13][16] As a young boy, Klopp aspired to become a doctor, but he did not believe he “was ever smart enough for a medical career”, saying “when they were handing out our A-Level certificates, my headmaster said to me, ‘I hope it works out with football, otherwise it’s not looking too good for you'”.[17]

While playing as an amateur footballer, Klopp worked a number of part-time jobs including working at a local video rental store and loading heavy items onto lorries.[16] In 1988, while attending the Goethe University of Frankfurt, as well as playing for Eintracht Frankfurt’s reserves, Klopp managed the Frankfurt D-Juniors.[18]In the summer of 1990, Klopp was signed by Mainz 05.[13][19] He spent most of his professional career in Mainz, from 1990 to 2001, with his attitude and commitment making him a fan-favourite.[20] Originally a striker, Klopp began playing as a defender in 1995.[13][21] That same year, Klopp obtained a diploma in sports science at the Goethe University of Frankfurt (MSc equivalent), writing his thesis about walking.[22] He retired as Mainz 05’s record goal scorer, registering 56 goals in total,[16] including 52 league goals.[20]

Klopp confessed that as a player he felt more suited to a managerial role, describing himself saying “I had fourth-division feet and a first-division head”.[21][23] Recalling his trial at Eintracht Frankfurt where he played alongside Andreas Möller, Klopp described how his 19-year-old self thought, “if that’s football, I’m playing a completely different game. He was world-class. I was not even class”.[24] As a player, Klopp closely followed his manager’s methods on the training field as well as making weekly trips to Cologne to study under Erich Rutemöller to obtain his Football Coaching Licence.[16]

Managerial career

Mainz 05

Upon his retirement from playing for Mainz 05 in 2. Bundesliga, Klopp was appointed as the club’s manager on 27 February 2001 following the dismissal of Eckhard Krautzun.[25][26] The day after, Klopp took charge of their first match, which saw Mainz 05 secure a 1–0 home win over MSV Duisburg.[13][27][28] Klopp went on to win six out of his first seven games in charge, eventually finishing in 14th place, avoiding relegation with one game to spare.[29] In his first full season in charge in 2001–02, Klopp guided Mainz to finish 4th in the league as he implemented his favoured pressing and counter-pressing tactics, narrowly missing promotion. Mainz again finished 4th in 2002–03, denied promotion again on the final day on goal difference.[13] After two seasons of disappointment, Klopp led Mainz to a third-place finish in the 2003–04 season, securing promotion to the Bundesliga for the first time in the club’s history.[13][30]

Despite having the smallest budget and the smallest stadium in the league, Mainz finished 11th in their first top-flight season in 2004–05. Klopp’s side finished 11th again in 2005–06 as well as securing qualification for the 2005–06 UEFA Cup, although they were knocked out in the first round by eventual champions Sevilla.[29] At the end of the 2006–07 season, Mainz 05 were relegated, but Klopp chose to remain with the club.[31] However, unable to achieve promotion the next year, Klopp resigned at the end of the 2007–08 season.[32] He finished with a record of 109 wins, 78 draws, and 83 losses.[33]

Borussia Dortmund

2008–2013: Consecutive league titles; first European final

In May 2008, Klopp was approached to become the new manager of Borussia Dortmund. Despite having interest from German champions Bayern Munich,[16] Klopp eventually signed a two-year contract at the club, which had finished in a disappointing 13th place under previous manager Thomas Doll.[34][35][36] Klopp’s opening game as manager was on 9 August in a 3–1 DFB-Pokal victory away to Rot-Weiss Essen.[37] In his first season, Klopp won his first trophy with the club after defeating German champions Bayern Munich to claim the 2008 German Supercup.[38] He led the club to a sixth-place finish in his first season in charge.[39] The next season Klopp secured European football as he led Dortmund to a fifth-place finish, despite having one of the youngest squads in the league.[16][40]

Klopp at a press conference ahead of Dortmund’s title-winning 2010–11 season

After losing 2–0 to Bayer Leverkusen on the opening day of the 2010–11 Bundesliga, Klopp’s Dortmund side won fourteen of their next fifteen matches to secure the top spot in the league for Christmas.[16] They clinched the 2010–11 Bundesliga title, their seventh league title, with two games to spare on 30 April 2011, beating 1. FC Nürnberg 2–0 at home.[41][42][43] Klopp’s side were the youngest ever side to win the Bundesliga.[16] Klopp and his team successfully defended their title, winning the 2011–12 Bundesliga.[44][45][46] Their total of 81 points that season[47] was the greatest total points in Bundesliga history and the 47 points earned in the second half of the season also set a new record.[48] Their 25 league wins equalled Bayern Munich’s record, while their 28-league match unbeaten run was the best ever recorded in a single German top-flight season.[49][note 2] Dortmund lost the 2011 DFL-Supercup against rivals Schalke 04.[51] On 12 May 2012, Klopp sealed the club’s first ever domestic double, by defeating Bayern Munich 5–2 to win the 2012 DFB-Pokal Final, which he described as being “better than [he] could have imagined”.[52][53]

Dortmund’s league form during the 2012–13 season was not as impressive as in the previous campaign, with Klopp insisting that his team would focus on the UEFA Champions League to make up for their disappointing run in that competition in the previous season.[54] Klopp’s team were drawn against Manchester City, Real Madrid and Ajax in the competition’s group of death.[55] However, they did not lose a game, topping the group with some impressive performances.[56] Dortmund faced José Mourinho’s Real Madrid again, this time in the semi-finals.[57] After an excellent result against them at home in the first leg, a 4–1 victory, a 2–0 loss meant Dortmund narrowly progressed to the final.[58] On 23 April 2013, it was announced that Dortmund’s crucial playmaker Mario Götze was moving on 1 July to rivals Bayern Munich after they had triggered Götze’s release clause of €37 million.[59][60][61] Klopp admitted his annoyance at the timing of the announcement of Götze’s move, as it was barely 36 hours before Dortmund’s Champions League semi-final with Real Madrid.[62] Klopp later said that Dortmund had no chance of convincing Götze to stay with Dortmund, saying, “He is a Pep Guardiola favourite”.[63] Dortmund lost the final 2–1 to Bayern, with an 89th-minute goal from Arjen Robben.[64] Dortmund finished in second place in the Bundesliga.[65] They also lost the 2012 DFL-Supercup,[66] and were knocked out of the DFB-Pokal in the round of 16.[67]

2013–2015: Final years at Dortmund

At the beginning of the 2013–14 season, Klopp extended his contract until June 2018.[68] Klopp received a fine of €10,000 on 17 March 2014 after getting sent off from a Bundesliga match against Borussia Mönchengladbach.[69] The ejection was a result of “verbal attack” on the referee, Deniz Aytekin, who stated that Klopp’s behaviour was “rude on more than one occasion”.[70] Borussia Dortmund Vorstand chairman Hans-Joachim Watzke stated that “I have to support Jürgen Klopp 100 percent in this case” because he saw no reason for a fine and denied that Klopp insulted the fourth official.[70] Dortmund finished the 2013–14 season in second place.[71] On 4 January 2014, it was announced that Dortmund striker Robert Lewandowski signed a pre-contract agreement to join Bayern Munich at the end of the season, becoming the second key player after Götze to leave the club within a year.[72] Also during the 2013–14 season, Dortmund won the 2013 DFL-Supercup,[73] but were knocked out of the Champions League in the quarter-finals by eventual champions Real Madrid.[74]

Klopp left Dortmund at the end of the 2014–15 season.

Dortmund started the 2014–15 season by winning the 2014 DFL-Supercup.[75] After a disappointing beginning of the season, Klopp announced in April that he would leave the club at the end of the season, saying “I really think the decision is the right one. This club deserves to be coached from the 100% right manager” as well as adding “I chose this time to announce it because in the last few years some player decisions were made late and there was no time to react”, referring to the departures of Götze and Lewandowski in the seasons prior.[76] He denied speculation that he was tired of the role, saying, “It’s not that I’m tired, I’ve not had contact with another club but don’t plan to take a sabbatical”.[76] Confronted with the thesis that Dortmund’s form immediately improved after the announcement, he joked, “If I’d known, I would have announced it at the beginning of the season”.[77][78][79] His final match in charge of the team was the 2015 DFB-Pokal Final, which Dortmund lost 3–1 against VfL Wolfsburg.[80] Dortmund finished in the league in seventh place[81] and were knocked out of Champions League in the round of 16 by Juventus.[82] He finished with a record of 180 wins, 69 draws, and 70 losses.[83]

Liverpool

2015–2017: Two final losses; return to Champions League

On 8 October 2015, Klopp agreed a three-year deal to become Liverpool manager, replacing Brendan Rodgers. According to El País, Liverpool co-owner John W. Henry did not trust public opinion so he looked for a mathematical method similar to Moneyball, the approach that Henry used for the Boston Red Sox in guiding them to three World Series wins, which he also owns via Fenway Sports Group.[84] The mathematical model turned out to be that of Cambridge physicist Ian Graham, which was used to select the manager, Klopp, and players essential for Liverpool to win the Champions League.[85] In his first press conference, Klopp described his new side saying “it is not a normal club, it is a special club. I had two very special clubs with Mainz and Dortmund. It is the perfect next step for me to be here and try and help” and stating his intention to deliver trophies within four years.[86][87] During his first conference, Klopp dubbed himself ‘The Normal One’ in a parody of José Mourinho’s famous ‘The Special One’ statement in 2004.[88]

Klopp after winning against Middlesbrough on the final day of the 2016–17 season to secure fourth in the league

Klopp’s debut was a 0–0 away draw with Tottenham Hotspur on 17 October.[89] On 28 October, Klopp secured his first win as Liverpool manager against AFC Bournemouth in the League Cup to proceed to the quarter-finals.[90] His first Premier League win came three days later, a 3–1 away victory against Chelsea.[91] After three 1–1 draws in the opening matches of the UEFA Europa League, Liverpool defeated Rubin Kazan 1–0 in Klopp’s first win in Europe as a Liverpool manager.[92] On 6 February 2016, he missed a league match to have an appendectomy after suffering suspected appendicitis.[93] On 28 February, Liverpool lost the League Cup Final at Wembley to Manchester City on penalties.[94] On 17 March, Liverpool progressed to the quarter-final of the Europa League by defeating Manchester United 3–1 on aggregate.[95] On 14 April, Liverpool fought back from a 3–1 second half deficit in the second leg of their quarter-final match against his former club Dortmund to win 4–3, advancing to the semi-finals 5–4 on aggregate.[96] On 5 May, Klopp guided Liverpool to their first European final since 2007 by beating Villarreal 3–1 on aggregate in the semi-finals of the Europa League.[97] In the final, Liverpool faced Sevilla, losing 1–3 with Daniel Sturridge scoring the opening goal for Liverpool in the first half.[98] Liverpool finished the 2015–16 season in eighth place.[99]

On 8 July 2016, Klopp and his coaching staff signed six-year extensions to their deals keeping them at Liverpool until 2022.[100] Liverpool qualified for the Champions League for the first time since 2014–15 on 21 May 2017, after winning 3–0 at home against Middlesbrough and finishing fourth in the 2016–17 Premier League season.[101]

2017–2019: First Champions League title

Klopp’s side finished fourth in the 2017–18 Premier League, securing qualification for the Champions League for a second consecutive season.[102] Along with the emergence of Andrew Robertson and Trent Alexander-Arnold as regular starters at fullback, Virgil van Dijk and Dejan Lovren built a strong partnership at the heart of Liverpool’s defence, with the Dutchman being credited for improving Liverpool’s previous defensive issues.[103][104][105] Klopp guided Liverpool to their first Champions League final since 2007 in 2018 after a 5–1 aggregate quarter-final win against eventual Premier League champions, Manchester City[106] and a 7–6 aggregate win over Roma in the semi-final.[107] However, Liverpool went on to lose in the final 3–1 to Real Madrid.[108] This was Klopp’s sixth defeat in seven major finals.[109] Despite their attacking prowess, Klopp’s side had been criticised for their relatively high number of goals conceded, something which Klopp sought to improve by signing defender Virgil van Dijk in the January transfer window,[110][111] for a reported fee of £75 million, a world record transfer fee for a defender.[112] In the summer transfer window, Klopp made a number of high-profile signings including midfielders Naby Keïta and Fabinho,[113][114] forward Xherdan Shaqiri[115] and goalkeeper Alisson Becker.[116]

Liverpool started the 2018–19 season with the best league start in the club’s history, winning their first six matches.[117] On 2 December 2018, Klopp was charged with misconduct after running onto the pitch during the Merseyside derby to celebrate Divock Origi’s 96th minute winning goal with goalkeeper Alisson Becker.[118] Following a 2–0 win against Wolverhampton Wanderers, Liverpool ended Christmas Day four points clear at the top of the league.[119] A 4–0 win against Newcastle United on Boxing Day saw Klopp’s side extend their lead in the league to six points at the half-way point of the season, as well as becoming only the fourth Premier League team to be unbeaten at this stage. It was Klopp’s 100th win in 181 matches as Liverpool manager.[120] Klopp’s defensive additions proved to be effective as his side equalled the all-time record for the fewest goals conceded at this stage of a top-flight season, conceding just 7 goals and keeping 12 clean sheets in 19 matches.[121] On 29 December, Klopp’s side thrashed Arsenal 5–1 at Anfield, extending their unbeaten home run in the league to 31 matches, matching their best such run in the competition. The result saw them move nine points clear at the top of the league, and meant Liverpool won all 8 of their matches in December.[122] Klopp subsequently received the Premier League Manager of the Month award for December.[123][124] Klopp’s side finished the season as runners-up to Manchester City, to whom they suffered their only league defeat of the season. Winning all of their last nine matches, Klopp’s Liverpool scored 97 points, the third-highest total in the history of the English top-division and the most points scored by a team without winning the title, and remained unbeaten at home for the second season running. Their thirty league wins matched the club record for wins in a season.[125][126]

Klopp during Liverpool’s Champions League victory parade

Success eluded Klopp’s Liverpool side in domestic cup competitions in 2018–19. On 26 September 2018, Klopp’s side were knocked out in the third round of the League Cup after losing 2–1 to Chelsea, their first defeat of the season in all competitions,[127] and were knocked out of the FA Cup after losing 2–1 to Wolves in the third round.[128] Despite a lack of success in domestic cup competitions, Liverpool enjoyed a vintage run in the 2018–19 UEFA Champions League. Klopp’s side finished second in their group by virtue of goals scored to qualify for the knockout phase,[129] before drawing German champions Bayern Munich in the round of 16. A scoreless draw in the first leg,[130] followed by 3–1 victory in the second leg at the Allianz Arena saw Liverpool qualify for the quarter-finals.[131] Liverpool won their quarter-final tie against Porto with an aggregate score of 6–1 to advance to the semi-finals,[132] where Klopp’s Liverpool faced tournament favourites Barcelona.[133] After suffering a 3–0 defeat at the Nou Camp,[134][135] Klopp reportedly asked his players to “just try” or “fail in the most beautiful way” in the second leg of the tie at Anfield.[136] In the second leg, Klopp’s side overturned the deficit with a 4–0 win, advancing to the final 4–3 on aggregate, despite Mohamed Salah and Roberto Firmino being absent with injuries, in what was described as one of the greatest comebacks in Champions League history.[137][138] In the final at the Metropolitano Stadium in Madrid against Tottenham Hotspur, Liverpool won 2–0 with goals from Salah and Divock Origi, despite only having 39% possession over the course of the game, giving Klopp his first trophy with Liverpool, his first Champions League title, and the club’s sixth European Cup/Champions League title overall.[139]

2019–20 season: Liverpool’s first Premier League title

Klopp’s side started the 2019–20 season by playing Manchester City in the 2019 FA Community Shield, against whom they lost 5–4 on penalties.[140] Having qualified as winners of the Champions League, Klopp’s side played Europa League champions Chelsea in the Super Cup. With the scores level after extra-time, Klopp’s side won 5–4 on penalties, giving Klopp his second trophy with the club. It was Liverpool’s fourth triumph in the tournament, placing them behind only Barcelona and AC Milan with five titles apiece.[141] In the 2019–20 Premier League, Klopp’s Liverpool won their first six matches to move five points clear at the top of the table. After the fourth match week, Klopp was named Premier League Manager of the Month for August, his fourth award of the monthly prize.[142] Their 2–1 away victory over Chelsea set a club-record seven successive away league wins and made Liverpool the first Premier League club to win their first six games in successive seasons.[143][144] On 23 September, Klopp was named as The Best FIFA Men’s Coach for 2019, ahead of Pep Guardiola and Mauricio Pochettino. At the awards ceremony, Klopp revealed that he had signed up to the Common Goal movement, donating 1% of his salary to a charity which funds organisations around the world using football to tackle social issues.[145][146] On 11 October, it was announced that Klopp had been named Manager of the Month for September, winning the award for the second consecutive month.[147]

On 30 November, following a 2–1 win over Brighton & Hove Albion, Klopp saw Liverpool equal an all-time club record of 31 consecutive league matches without defeat, since the club’s last defeat to Manchester City on 3 January, dating back to 1988.[148] His side broke the record a week later following a 5–2 win over Everton.[149]
Following a victory against Red Bull Salzburg on 10 December that saw Liverpool top their Champions League group,[150] Klopp signed a contract extension that will keep him at the club until 2024.[151] In December, Klopp won his third Premier League Manager of the month award for November, after winning all four league matches with Liverpool.[152] On 21 December, he led Liverpool to their first FIFA Club World Cup trophy, with victory over Flamengo in the final,[153] making his team the first English side to win the international treble of the Champions League, Super Cup and Club World Cup.[154][155] His side ended 2019 with a 1–0 home win against Wolves. The result extended Liverpool’s unbeaten home run to 50 matches and gave Klopp’s reds a 13-point lead at the top of the table with a game-in-hand.[156] Klopp was subsequently named as the Premier League Manager of the Month for December, winning the award for the fourth time that season.[157] A 1–0 away win against Tottenham Hotspur on 11 January 2020 extended Liverpool’s unbeaten run to 38 league games – a club record – totalling 61 points from 21 games, the most ever at that stage of the season by a side in Europe’s top five leagues.[158] On 1 February, Klopp’s side won 4–0 at home against Southampton to go 22 points clear at the top of the Premier League; the biggest end-of-day lead in English top-flight history, and following second-place Manchester City’s defeat to Spurs the next day, the largest gap ever between first and second in top-flight history.[159][160] Klopp was subsequently named as the Premier League Manager of the Month for January – his fifth of the season so far – breaking the record for the most wins of the award in a single season.[161]

A 3–2 home victory against West Ham United on 24 February 2020 saw Klopp’s side equal the English top-flight records for the most consecutive wins (18) and the most consecutive home wins (21, set by Bill Shankly’s Liverpool side in the 1972–73 season); the latter setting a record for the Premier League era. Klopp said after the game that he “never thought [Manchester City’s win record] would be broken or equalled.”[162] A 2–1 win against AFC Bournemouth at Anfield on 7 March saw Liverpool set an English top-flight record of 22 consecutive home wins.[163] On 25 June, Klopp’s side clinched the title with 7 games left to spare; it was the club’s nineteenth league title, its first since 1989–90 and its first during the Premier League era.[164] In the season, Liverpool set a number of English-top flight records including the most consecutive home wins (23), the largest point lead at the end of a matchweek (22),[165] and upon winning the league claimed the unusual achievement of winning the Premier League earlier than any other team by games played (with seven remaining) and later than any other team by date (being the only team to clinch the title in June).[166][167] Beginning the season prior, Liverpool also enjoyed a 44 match unbeaten run in the league – the second-longest streak in top-flight history – ended by Watford on 29 February.[168] At the end of the season, Klopp was named LMA Manager of the Year[169] as well as Premier League Manager of the Season.[170]

2020–present: Domestic and international success

After winning the opening three league games of the 2020–21 season against Leeds United, Chelsea and Arsenal, on 4 October 2020, Klopp’s side lost 7–2 away to Aston Villa. It was the first time Liverpool conceded 7 goals in a league match since 1963.[171] However, following a controversial draw in the first Merseyside derby of the season, in which defender Virgil van Dijk was injured for the rest of the season, they then bounced back with wins against Sheffield United and West Ham United.[172] They went into the international break third in the league and top of their group in the Champions League after a 5–0 win against Atalanta.[173] On 22 November, Klopp led Liverpool to a club record 64th consecutive league match unbeaten at Anfield – surpassing the previous record of 63 games under Bob Paisley between 1978 and 1981 – with a 3–0 win over Leicester City.[174] On 17 December, Klopp was named the Best FIFA Men’s Coach for the second successive year having guided the club to their first league title triumph in 30 years.[175] On 20 December, Klopp won the BBC’s Sports Coach of the Year.[176] A poor run of form in the early part of 2021 – which coincided with Liverpool being without their three senior central defenders who were out injured for the remainder of the season – saw Liverpool as low as eighth in March. The club then rallied to go undefeated in their last ten league games, with eight wins and two draws, which saw Liverpool finish 3rd in the league.[177] This run of form saw Klopp rely on a new defensive partnership of Nat Phillips and Rhys Williams, both of whom had no prior experience in the Premier League, and included Klopp’s first win at Old Trafford, home of arch rivals Manchester United, with Liverpool winning 4–2.[178] The five league wins in May saw Klopp named Premier League Manager of the Month, the ninth time he has received the award.[179]

Klopp celebrating Liverpool winning the domestic cup double in a trophy parade in 2022.

Having started the 2021–22 season with five wins and three draws from the first eight league fixtures, on 24 October 2021, Liverpool beat Manchester United 5–0 at Old Trafford.[180] This was Klopp’s 200th victory in 331 games in charge of Liverpool, making him the fastest manager in the club’s history to reach that milestone.[181] On 1 December, Klopp led Liverpool to a 4–1 away win against Everton in the Premier League as the club became the first team in English top-flight history to score at least two goals in 18 successive games in all competitions.[182] On 7 December, Liverpool won 2–1 away against AC Milan at the San Siro and became the first English club to win all six Champions League group games in the competition’s history.[183] On 16 December, Klopp became the fastest manager in Liverpool history to record 150 league wins with a 3–1 home win against Newcastle United in what was Liverpool’s 2,000th top-flight win, the first club in English history to reach this landmark.[184] On 27 February 2022, he led Liverpool to their first domestic final since 2016, the 2022 EFL Cup Final where they defeated Thomas Tuchel’s Chelsea 11–10 on penalties after a 0–0 draw that went to extra time.[185] It was a record-breaking 9th victory for Liverpool, and the first time they had won it since 2012.[186] Following Sean Dyche’s dismissal by Burnley on 15 April, Klopp became the longest serving manager in the Premier League.[187] On 28 April, Klopp signed a two-year contract extension, extending his stay at Liverpool until 2026.[188] In his announcement to Liverpool supporters he cited his wife Ulla as one of the main reasons for signing the contract.[188] In the 2022 FA Cup Final on 14 May, Liverpool won their first FA Cup since 2006 where they again defeated Chelsea, this time 6–5 on penalties, with Klopp becoming the first German manager to win the trophy.[189] Liverpool would finish second in the Premier League by 1 point before losing 1–0 to Real Madrid in the 2022 UEFA Champions League Final.[190]

On 30 July 2022, Liverpool opened the 2022–23 season by winning the 2022 FA Community Shield with a 3–1 win over Manchester City, in what was Klopp’s first FA Community Shield.[191]

Manager profile

Tactics

Klopp is a notable proponent of Gegenpressing, a tactic in which the team, after losing possession of the ball, immediately attempts to win back possession, rather than falling back to regroup.[192][193] Klopp has stated that a well-executed counter-pressing system can be more effective than any playmaker when it comes to creating chances.[194] Commenting on his pressing tactics, Klopp said that “The best moment to win the ball is immediately after your team just lost it. The opponent is still looking for orientation where to pass the ball. He will have taken his eyes off the game to make his tackle or interception and he will have expended energy. Both make him vulnerable”.[195] The tactic requires great amounts of speed, organisation and stamina, with the idea of regaining possession of the ball as far up the pitch as possible to counter possible counter-attacks.[196] It also requires high levels of discipline: The team must be compact to close down spaces for the opponent to thread passes through, and must learn when to stop pressing to avoid exhaustion and protect from long balls passed into the space behind the pressing defence.[195] Despite Klopp’s pressing tactics resulting in a high attacking output, his Liverpool side was criticised at times for its inability to control games and keep clean sheets.[197] However, Klopp developed his tactics to incorporate more possession based football and more midfield organisation,[198] as well as overseeing the transfers of Alisson Becker, Virgil Van Dijk, Naby Keïta and Fabinho ahead of the 2018–19 season which saw Liverpool achieve their best league start in the club’s history, and equal the all-time record for the fewest goals conceded at the mid-point of a top-flight season, conceding just 7 goals and keeping 12 clean sheets.[121]

One of Klopp’s main influences is Italian coach Arrigo Sacchi, whose ideas about the closing down of space in defence and the use of zones and reference points inspired the basis of Klopp’s counter-pressing tactics, as well Wolfgang Frank, his former coach during his time as a player for Mainz from 1995 to 1997 and then 1998–2000. Klopp himself said “I’ve never met Sacchi, but I learned everything I am as a coach from him and my former coach [Frank], who took it from Sacchi”.[196]

The importance of emotion is something Klopp has underlined throughout his managerial career, saying “Tactical things are so important, you cannot win without tactical things, but the emotion makes the difference”.[196] He believes that the players should embrace their emotions, describing how “[football is] the only sport where emotion has this big of an influence”.[199] Ahead of the Merseyside derby in 2016, Klopp said “The best football is always about expression of emotion”.[200]

In his first two full seasons at Liverpool, Klopp almost exclusively employed a 4–3–3 formation, using a front three of wingers Mohamed Salah and Sadio Mané surrounding false-9 Roberto Firmino, supported by Philippe Coutinho in midfield. The foursome earned the moniker of the ‘Fab Four’ as they supplied the majority of the team’s goals over this period of time.[201] Roberto Firmino’s exceptionally high number of tackles for a striker under Klopp’s management encapsulates his style of play, demanding a high-press from all his players and having his striker defend from the front.[202] Following Coutinho’s departure in January 2018, the remaining front three increased their attacking output and continued to create chances as Salah won the Premier League Golden Boot in 2018,[203] before sharing the award with his team-mate, Mané, in 2019.[204] In the early part of the 2018–19 season Klopp, at times, used the 4–2–3–1 formation, which he had previously used at Dortmund. While this was partially to account for a number of injuries to key players, it also allowed Klopp to accommodate new signing Xherdan Shaqiri, playing Roberto Firmino in a more creative role and allowing Salah to play in a more central offensive position.[205][206] However, for the remainder of the season, the 4–3–3 formation, as with the previous two seasons, became Klopp’s preferred setup as his side finished as runners-up in the Premier League and reached a second consecutive Champions League final,[207] where Klopp won his first Champions League title as a manager.[139]

Reception

Klopp is often credited with pioneering the resurgence of Gegenpressing in modern football, and is regarded by fellow professional managers and players as one of the best managers in the world.[208][209][210][211] In 2016, Guardiola suggested that Klopp could be “the best manager in the world at creating teams who attack”.[212] Klopp has also received praise for building competitive teams without spending as much as many direct rivals, placing emphasis on sustainability over purely short-term success.[213]

As well as receiving plaudits for his tactics, Klopp is also highly regarded as a motivator,[213] with Liverpool forward Roberto Firmino saying: “He motivates us in a different way every day”,[214] and being praised by Guardiola as a “huge motivator”.[212] In 2019, the chief executive of the League Managers Association (LMA) said that Klopp had ‘redefined man-management’ in the modern era, and highlighted his consistency in European competitions;[215] in Klopp’s first three European campaigns with Liverpool he was undefeated over two-legged knockout ties.[216] Klopp was described by Jonathan Wilson of The Guardian as “a hugely charismatic figure who inspires players with his personality”,[217] while Vincent Hogan of the Irish Independent writes, “Not since Bill Shankly have Liverpool had a manager of such charisma”.[218]

Klopp has gained notoriety for his enthusiastic touchline celebrations.[219] He received criticism in 2018 for taking things ‘too far’ when running on to the pitch to embrace Alisson Becker to celebrate an added time winner in the Merseyside Derby.[220] Pep Guardiola spoke in defence of Klopp, saying: “I did it against Southampton. There are a lot of emotions there in those moments”.[221]

In June 2020, Manchester United’s record goalscorer Wayne Rooney responded to Klopp’s dismissal of the suggestion that he could emulate Alex Ferguson’s success at Manchester United, saying “Klopp says it’s impossible for any club to dominate like United once did, but he is wrong. […] I think if Klopp, who is only 53, stayed at Anfield for the next ten years, Liverpool would win at least five Premier League titles. He could keep building great sides because, as I mentioned, players join clubs to work with managers as good as him.”[222]

Outside football

Personal life

Klopp has been married twice. He was previously wedded to Sabine and they have a son, Marc (born 1988),[223][224] who has played for a number of German clubs including FSV Frankfurt under-19s, KSV Klein-Karben, SV Darmstadt 98, Borussia Dortmund II and the Kreisliga side VfL Kemminghausen 1925.[223] On 5 December 2005, Klopp married social worker and children’s writer Ulla Sandrock.[225][226] They met at a pub during an Oktoberfest celebration that same year.[227][228] She has a son, Dennis, from a previous marriage.[229][230] On 10 February 2021, Klopp confirmed that his mother, Elisabeth, had died; he was unable to attend her funeral in Germany due to COVID-19 travel restrictions.[231]

He is close friends with fellow manager David Wagner, first meeting each other during their playing days at Mainz and with Wagner being Klopp’s best man at his 2005 wedding. Klopp has described their relationship as “In 1991 someone stuck us in a room together and that was the beginning of a life-long friendship!”[232]

Klopp is a Lutheran who has referred to his faith in public, citing the importance of his beliefs in a media interview. He turned to religion more seriously after the death of his father, who was a Catholic, from liver cancer in 1998.[233][234][235][236]

Media career

Klopp at Frankfurt Motor Show 2019

In 2005, Klopp was a regular expert commentator on the German television network ZDF, analysing the Germany national team.[237] He worked as a match analyst during the 2006 FIFA World Cup,[13] for which he received the Deutscher Fernsehpreis for “Best Sports Show” in October 2006,[238][239] as well as Euro 2008.[240] Klopp’s term came to an end after the latter competition and he was succeeded by Oliver Kahn.[241] During the 2010 World Cup, Klopp worked with RTL alongside Günther Jauch,[242] for which Klopp again won the award for the same category.[243] Klopp has also appeared in the documentary films Trainer! (2013) and Und vorne hilft der liebe Gott (2016).[244][245][246][247]

Political views

In an interview for The Guardian in April 2018, Klopp expressed his opposition to Brexit claiming that it “makes no sense” and advocated for a second referendum.[248]

Politically, Klopp considers himself to be left-wing. He told journalist Raphael Honigstein:

I’m on the left, of course. More left than middle. I believe in the welfare state. I’m not privately insured. I would never vote for a party because they promised to lower the top tax rate. My political understanding is this: if I am doing well, I want others to do well, too. If there’s something I will never do in my life it is vote for the right”.[249]

Pro-vaccine stance

During the COVID-19 pandemic, Klopp became a notable proponent of the COVID-19 vaccine, with himself having both vaccines as well as the recommended booster by December 2021. He has compared not getting the vaccine to drink driving, saying: “I don’t take the vaccination only to protect me, I take the vaccination to protect all the people around me. I don’t understand why that is a limitation of freedom because, if it is, then not being allowed to drink and drive is a limitation of freedom as well. I got the vaccination because I was concerned about myself but even more so about everybody around me. If I get [Covid] and I suffer from it: my fault. If I get it and spread it to someone else: my fault and not their fault.”[250] Klopp’s Liverpool side were notable for being one of the few Premier League sides to be fully vaccinated, with Klopp saying it was an act of solidarity.[251]

Prior to Liverpool’s game on 16 December 2021, with the UK experiencing a new wave of the Omicron variant, Klopp used his Matchday programme notes to recommend Liverpool fans take the vaccine if they hadn’t already, as well as telling them to “ignore those who pretend to know. Ignore lies and misinformation. Listen to people who know best. If you do that, you end up wanting the vaccine and the booster.”[252]

Endorsements

Klopp’s popularity is used in advertisements by, among others, Puma, Opel and the German cooperative banking group Volksbanken-Raiffeisenbanken.[253] According to Horizont, trade magazine for the German advertising industry, and the business weekly Wirtschaftswoche, Klopp’s role as “brand ambassador” for Opel successfully helped the struggling carmaker to increase sales.[254][255] He is also an ambassador for the German anti-racism campaign “Respekt! Kein Platz für Rassismus” (“Respect! No room for racism”)[256][257][258] and featured in a video for the song Komm hol die Pille raus by children’s song author Volker Rosin to encourage young football talents.[259] Starting in 2019, Klopp became an ambassador for Erdinger, a German brewery best known for its wheat beers.[260] Klopp featured in an advertising campaign for the beer, telling bartenders to “Never skim an Erdinger.”[261] After Liverpool’s title win in 2020, the Brewery also produced a special limited edition series of cans featuring Klopp’s face and autograph, which sold out quickly online.[262] In 2020, he signed a personal endorsement deal with Adidas, agreeing to become a brand ambassador and wearing their footwear in training sessions and future advertisements.[263] In 2021 he appeared in an ad for Snickers.[264][265]

Career statistics

Appearances and goals by club, season and competition[266][267][268]

Club Season League DFB-Pokal Other Total
Division Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals
Rot-Weiss Frankfurt 1989–90 Oberliga Hessen 0 0 1 0 5[a] 0 6 0
Mainz 05 1990–91 2. Bundesliga 33 10 0 0 33 10
1991–92 2. Bundesliga 32[b] 8 1 0 33 8
1992–93 2. Bundesliga 41 3 2 1 43 4
1993–94 2. Bundesliga 34 7 1 1 35 8
1994–95 2. Bundesliga 33 7 3 1 36 8
1995–96 2. Bundesliga 29 2 2 0 31 2
1996–97 2. Bundesliga 24 3 0 0 24 3
1997–98 2. Bundesliga 31 4 1 1 32 5
1998–99 2. Bundesliga 29 4 1 0 30 4
1999–2000 2. Bundesliga 30 4 3 0 33 4
2000–01 2. Bundesliga 9 0 1 0 10 0
Total 325 52 15 4 0 0 340 56
Career total 325 52 16 4 5 0 346 56
  1. ^ Appearances in Aufstiegsrunde 2. Bundesliga (promotion play-offs)
  2. ^ Appearances in 2. Bundesliga Süd as the league was split into a ‘North’ and ‘South’ due to the merging of clubs from former East Germany

Managerial statistics

As of match played 6 May 2023
Managerial record by team and tenure

Team From To Record Ref.
P W D L Win %
Mainz 05 27 February 2001 30 June 2008 270 109 78 83 040.4 [33]
Borussia Dortmund 1 July 2008 30 June 2015 319 180 69 70 056.4 [83][269]
Liverpool 8 October 2015 Present 430 259 96 75 060.2 [270]
Total 1,019 548 243 228 053.8

Honours

Mainz 05

  • 2. Bundesliga third-place promotion: 2003–04[271]

Borussia Dortmund

  • Bundesliga: 2010–11, 2011–12[272]
  • DFB-Pokal: 2011–12;[273] runner-up: 2013–14,[274] 2014–15[275]
  • DFL-Supercup: 2013,[276] 2014[277]
  • UEFA Champions League runner-up: 2012–13[278]

Liverpool

  • Premier League: 2019–20[279]
  • FA Cup: 2021–22[280]
  • Football League Cup/EFL Cup: 2021–22;[281] runner-up: 2015–16[282]
  • FA Community Shield: 2022[283]
  • UEFA Champions League: 2018–19;[284] runner-up: 2017–18,[109] 2021–22[285]
  • UEFA Super Cup: 2019[141]
  • FIFA Club World Cup: 2019[153]
  • UEFA Europa League runner-up: 2015–16[286]

Individual

  • German Football Manager of the Year: 2011,[287] 2012,[287] 2019[288]
  • Deutscher Fernsehpreis: 2006, 2010[239][289]
  • Onze d’Or Coach of the Year: 2019[290]
  • The Best FIFA Men’s Coach: 2019,[291] 2020[292]
  • IFFHS World’s Best Club Coach: 2019[293]
  • IFFHS Men’s World Team: 2019[294]
  • World Soccer Awards World Manager of the Year: 2019[295]
  • Globe Soccer Awards Best Coach of the Year: 2019[296]
  • LMA Hall of Fame: 2019[215]
  • LMA Manager of the Year: 2019–20,[169] 2021–22[297]
  • Premier League Manager of the Season: 2019–20, 2021–22[279]
  • Premier League Manager of the Month: September 2016, December 2018, March 2019, August 2019, September 2019, November 2019, December 2019, January 2020, May 2021[279]
  • BBC Sports Personality of the Year Coach Award: 2020[298]
  • Freedom of the City of Liverpool: 2022[299]

See also

  • List of English football championship-winning managers
  • List of European Cup and UEFA Champions League winning managers
  • List of UEFA Super Cup winning managers
  • List of FIFA Club World Cup winning managers
  • List of DFB-Pokal winning managers

Notes

  1. ^ Klopp’s Dortmund scored a then-record number of points and wins in a Bundesliga season in 2011–12; both records were subsequently broken by Bayern Munich in the 2012–13 season
  2. ^ The record number of points, for the whole season and the second half of the season, and the record number of league wins set or equalled by Dortmund in the 2011–12 season were broken by Bayern Munich in the 2012–13 season.[50]

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  298. ^ “Liverpool and Jurgen Klopp win Team and Coach of the Year at Sports Personality of the Year 2020”. BBC Sport. 20 December 2020. Retrieved 20 December 2020.
  299. ^ Read, 4 Min (2 November 2022). “Freedom of Liverpool for Jürgen Klopp”. Liverpool Express. Retrieved 2 November 2022.

External links

  • Profile at the Liverpool F.C. website
  • Jürgen Klopp – UEFA coaching record (archived)

Joined: October 2015
Honours: Community Shield (2022), FA Cup (2022), Carabao Cup (2022), Premier League (2019-20), FIFA Club World Cup (2019), UEFA Super Cup (2019), Champions League (2019)


Jürgen Klopp made Liverpool champions of England, Europe and the world within five years of his appointment at Anfield in October 2015.

The charismatic German ended the Reds’ 30-year wait for a league title in the summer of 2020 as his relentless side, one carefully constructed throughout his tenure, emphatically secured top spot in the Premier League with seven games remaining.

Revered by fans from the earliest weeks of his spell on Merseyside, Klopp had already delivered the club’s sixth European Cup the previous year, when Tottenham Hotspur were defeated 2-0 in Madrid in the Reds’ second successive Champions League final appearance.

The UEFA Super Cup, a first ever FIFA Club World Cup and, in 2021-22, a domestic double of FA Cup and League Cup have also been added to the trophy cabinet by a Liverpool squad that has perfectly adapted to the vision of one of the most forward-thinking coaches in the game.

Klopp’s CV already boasted two Bundesliga titles, a German Cup and a Champions League final appearance before he took the Reds reins, all earned during a seven-year stint at Borussia Dortmund.

His journey as a player had started – and in fact ended – with FSV Mainz 05, where he spent his entire career before retiring at 34.

As the man himself once admitted, he was not the most talented player in the world, but he found himself able to make up for any shortcomings thanks to a sharp understanding of the game.

“I never succeeded in bringing to the field what was going on in my brain,” he said. “I had the talent for the fifth division, and the mind for the Bundesliga. The result was a career in the second division.”

This ability to apply his experience was evident in a positional move from striker to centre-half as his career progressed, and it resulted in more than 300 professional appearances.

It also proved to be the perfect preparation for a career in coaching, which began in 2001 when he hung up his boots and moved straight into the dugout of a club he had already given 11 years’ service to.

Throughout Klopp’s time as a player, and indeed Mainz’s history, they had rarely troubled the upper echelons of German football – but he found himself in a position to change all that as the manager.

The Stuttgart-born boss ended a 41-year wait for Bundesliga football at the Stadion am Bruchweg when he oversaw promotion from the second tier in his third season in charge.

Three seasons in the top flight followed and though Mainz eventually returned to the 2.Bundesliga, Klopp had already established himself as a coach of great repute.

As a result, it was little surprise to see Borussia Dortmund swoop in the summer of 2008 as they looked to bounce back from a 13th-placed finish the season before.

After steadying the ship and taking the Westfalenstadion side to sixth and fifth in his first and second seasons respectively, Klopp masterminded back-to-back Bundesliga title wins.

Those successes, allied to a German Cup win in 2011-12, helped to re-establish Dortmund among their country’s elite, and by his fifth campaign at the helm Klopp was also proving himself capable in Europe.

In 2012-13, Dortmund reached the final of the Champions League, where they were defeated by rivals Bayern Munich, but a loss at the hands of better-resourced foes did the manager’s reputation little harm.

That is largely because it was not just the achievements of his team that caught the eye but also the relentless pressing and attractive attacking football that underpinned those successes.

As Klopp explained: “What I love is not serenity football, it’s fighting football – that’s what I like. What we call in Germany ‘English football’ – rainy day, heavy pitch, everybody is dirty in the face and they go home and can’t play football for the next four weeks.”

He arrived on Merseyside looking to apply that approach in its philosophical home of England, and oversaw an exciting first season at the helm punctuated by a series of exhilarating matches and performances.

Though Liverpool ultimately lost out in both the League Cup and Europa League finals, Klopp’s maiden campaign saw plenty of progress and featured an unforgettable win over former club Dortmund that will go down as one of Anfield’s greatest games.

Ahead of Klopp’s first full season in charge, the club announced the manager had signed a new, long-term contract extension.

And that show of faith was rewarded in 2016-17 as the Reds secured a top-four Premier League finish and a place in the next season’s Champions League qualifiers as a result.

Liverpool’s resurgence continued into the new campaign and their return to Europe’s elite club competition was marked by an unforgettable run all the way to the final in Kyiv.

Heartbreak was inflicted by Real Madrid that night but another top-four placing meant Liverpool had the chance to exorcise those memories a year later.

And that they did, with the win over Spurs in Madrid being made possible by an unforgettable 4-0 semi-final second-leg victory against Barcelona in what was perhaps the greatest European night in Anfield’s history.

The Reds had been pipped to the Premier League title by Manchester City in 2018-19 despite a club-record total of 97 points, but – just as they had used their near-miss in the European Cup as motivation – returned even stronger at the next opportunity.

Twenty-six wins out of 27 from the start of the campaign established Liverpool as runaway leaders and put Klopp, who had again prolonged his stay – to 2024 – during the season, and his players on the brink of history.

They sealed the club’s 19th league championship when Premier League football resumed after a three-month halt due to the COVID-19 pandemic, with Manchester City’s defeat at Chelsea on June 25, 2020 – the night after a trademark win over Crystal Palace at Anfield – confirming their title and Klopp’s legacy.

A series of injuries to key players made for a difficult 2020-21 season; however, a 10-game unbeaten run at the conclusion of the campaign secured a third-placed finish.

And Liverpool roared back to form in 2021-22, securing the Carabao Cup by defeating Chelsea on penalties at Wembley and launching a sensational bid for a quadruple.

With Klopp having signed another new contract extension in April 2022, the Reds went on to lift the FA Cup for the first time in his reign and narrowly finished runners-up in both the Premier League and Champions League.

Current club
Liverpool

Current job
Manager

Citizenship

Germany Germany

Age

55

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Personal Details

Name in Home Country /

Full Name:

Jürgen Norbert Klopp
Date of Birth: Jun 16, 1967
Place of Birth: Stuttgart  Germany
Age: 55
Citizenship: Germany  Germany
Avg. term as coach: 7.31 Years
Coaching Licence: UEFA Pro Licence
Preferred formation: 4-3-3 Attacking

Stats 22/23

Competition Matches W D L Points PPM
Total: 49 26 9 14 87 1.78
Premier League  Premier League 35 18 8 9 62 1.77
UEFA Champions League  UEFA Champions League 8 5 3 15 1.88
FA Cup  FA Cup 3 1 1 1 4 1.33
EFL Cup  EFL Cup 2 1 1 3 1.50
Community Shield  Community Shield 1 1 3 3.00

History

This is an overview of the career of a manager.

Compact

Detailed

wappen Club & role Appointed In charge until Matches PPM
Liverpool FC Liverpool
Manager
15/16 (Oct 8, 2015)  expected Jun 30, 2026  428 2.05
Borussia Dortmund Bor. Dortmund
Manager
08/09 (Jul 1, 2008)  14/15 (Jun 30, 2015)  318 1.90
1.FSV Mainz 05 1.FSV Mainz 05
Manager
00/01 (Feb 28, 2001)  07/08 (Jun 30, 2008)  269 1.51
Eintracht Frankfurt E. Frankfurt
Youth Coach
88/89 (Jul 1, 1988)  89/90 (Jun 30, 1990)  0.00

Transfer history as a player

This page displays all transfers for the selected player. Alongside the date of the transfer, the clubs involved and the transfer fee, it also displays the market value of the player at the time of the transfer.

Season Date Left Joined MV Fee  
00/01 Feb 27, 2001 1.FSV Mainz 05 Germany 1.FSV Mainz 05 Retired Retired

90/91 Jul 1, 1990 SG Rot-Weiss Frankfurt Germany RW Frankfurt 1.FSV Mainz 05 Germany 1.FSV Mainz 05 free transfer

89/90 Jul 1, 1989 Viktoria Sindlingen Germany Vik. Sindlingen SG Rot-Weiss Frankfurt Germany RW Frankfurt free transfer

88/89 Jul 1, 1988 Eintracht Frankfurt II Germany E. Frankfurt II Viktoria Sindlingen Germany Vik. Sindlingen free transfer

87/88 Jul 1, 1987 1.FC Pforzheim Germany 1.FC Pforzheim Eintracht Frankfurt II Germany E. Frankfurt II free transfer

86/87 Jan 1, 1987 TuS Ergenzingen Germany TuS Ergenzingen 1.FC Pforzheim Germany 1.FC Pforzheim free transfer

86/87 Jul 1, 1986 TuS Ergenzingen U19 Germany Ergenzingen U19 TuS Ergenzingen Germany TuS Ergenzingen

Total transfer fees: 0  

Further details

Jürgen Klopp is the father of Marc Klopp (Retired).

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Jürgen Klopp
Jürgen Klopp
Personal information
Full name Jürgen Norbert Klopp
Date of birth 16 June 1967 (age 55)
Place of birth    Stuttgart, Flag of Germany West Germany
Height 1.93 m (6 ft 4 in)
Playing position Striker/Defender
Club information
Current club Flag of England Liverpool (manager)
Youth clubs
1975–1983
1983–1989
Flag of Germany SV Glatten
Flag of Germany TuS Ergenzingen
Senior clubs
Years Club App (Gls)
1987
1987–1988
1988–1989
1989–1990
1990–2001
Flag of Germany 1. FC Pforzheim
Flag of Germany Eintracht Frankfurt II
Flag of Germany Viktoria Sindlingen
Flag of Germany Rot-Weiss Frankfurt
Flag of Germany Mainz 05
0000(0)

0000(0)
325 0(52)   

Teams managed
2001–2008
2008–2015
2015–
Flag of Germany Mainz 05
Flag of Germany Borussia Dortmund
Flag of England Liverpool

Jürgen Norbert Klopp (born 16 June 1967) is a German professional football manager and former player who is the manager of Premier League club Liverpool. He is widely regarded as one of the best managers in the world.

Klopp spent most of his playing career at Mainz 05; a hard-working and physical player, he was initially deployed as a striker, before being moved to defence. Upon retiring in 2001, Klopp became the club’s manager, and secured Bundesliga promotion in 2004. After suffering relegation in the 2006–07 season and unable to achieve promotion, Klopp resigned in 2008 as the club’s longest-serving manager. He then became manager of Borussia Dortmund, guiding them to the Bundesliga title in 2010–11, before winning Dortmund’s first-ever domestic double during a record-breaking season. Klopp also guided Dortmund to a runner-up finish in the 2012–13 UEFA Champions League before leaving in 2015 as their longest-serving manager.

Klopp was appointed manager of Liverpool in 2015. He guided the club to successive UEFA Champions League finals in 2018 and 2019, winning the latter to secure his first – and Liverpool’s sixth – title in the competition. Klopp’s side finished second in the 2018–19 Premier League, registering 97 points; the then third-highest total in the history of the English top division, and the most by a team without winning the title. The following season, Klopp won the UEFA Super Cup and Liverpool’s first FIFA Club World Cup, before delivering Liverpool’s first Premier League title, en route to which his side scored 99 points – the second-highest total in the English top division – and broke a number of top-flight records.

Klopp is a notable proponent of Gegenpressing, whereby the team, after losing possession, immediately attempts to win back possession, rather than falling back to regroup. His sides have been described as playing ‘heavy metal’ football by pundits and fellow managers, in reference to their pressing and high attacking output. Klopp has cited his main influences as Italian coach Arrigo Sacchi, and former Mainz coach Wolfgang Frank. The importance of emotion is something Klopp has underlined throughout his managerial career, and he has gained notoriety for his enthusiastic touchline celebrations.

External links

  • Jürgen Klopp profile at the official Liverpool F.C. website
  • Jürgen Klopp profile at Goal.com

Liverpool FC

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Terzić (2022–)

Germany crest

Ничего не найдено.

См. также в других словарях:

  • Клопп, Юрген — Стиль этой статьи неэнциклопедичен или нарушает нормы русского языка. Статью следует исправить согласно стилистическим правилам Википедии …   Википедия

  • Клопп — (нем. Klopp)  немецкая фамилия. Известные носители: Клопп, Онно Клопп, Юрген …   Википедия

  • Рёбер, Юрген — Юрген Рёбер …   Википедия

  • Боруссия (футбольный клуб, Дортмунд) — У этого термина существуют и другие значения, см. Боруссия. Боруссия Дортмунд …   Википедия

  • Боруссия (футбольный клуб — Боруссия (футбольный клуб, Дортмунд) Запрос «BVB» перенаправляется сюда; О транспортной компании Базеля см. Basler Verkehrs Betriebe. Боруссия Дортмунд …   Википедия

  • Боруссия (Дортмунд) — Запрос «BVB» перенаправляется сюда. О транспортной компании Базеля см. Basler Verkehrs Betriebe. Боруссия Дортмунд Полное название …   Википедия

  • Боруссия Дортмунд — Запрос «BVB» перенаправляется сюда. О транспортной компании Базеля см. Basler Verkehrs Betriebe. Боруссия Дортмунд Полное название …   Википедия

  • Боруссия Дортмунд (футбольный клуб) — Запрос «BVB» перенаправляется сюда. О транспортной компании Базеля см. Basler Verkehrs Betriebe. Боруссия Дортмунд Полное название …   Википедия

  • Суботич — Суботич, Невен Невен Суботич Общая информация Родился …   Википедия

  • Кох, Юлиан — Юлиан Кох Общая информация …   Википедия

  • Суботич, Невен — Невен Суботич …   Википедия

В Википедии есть статьи о других людях с такой фамилией, см. Клопп.

Ю́рген Но́рберт Клопп (нем. Jürgen Norbert Klopp; 16 июня 1967, Штутгарт, ФРГ) — бывший немецкий футболист и ныне футбольный тренер. Получил признание во время его работы в футбольном клубе «Майнц 05», где он играл с 1990 по 2001 и вслед за этим тренировал команду с 2001 по 2008 год. В настоящее время он тренирует команду первой немецкой бундеслиги Боруссия Дортмунд, с которой стал чемпионом Германии в сезонах 2010/11 и 2011/12 и обладателем кубка Германии в сезоне 2011/12.

Будучи действующим игроком закончил учебу в университете Франкфурта, где обучался по специальности спортивный учёный. Написал свою дипломную работу на тему ходьбы. После, Клопп, который на этот момент владел только лицензией тренера категории A, получил лицензию профессионального футбольного тренера в спортивном институте Кельна.

Карьера игрока

Прежде чем Клопп перешёл в свою первую и единственную профессиональную команду «Майнц 05» в 1990, он играл в юношеских командах SV Glatten (1972—1983), TuS Ergenzingen (1983—1986), далее в спортивных клубах TuS Ergenzingen (1986—1987), 1. FC Pforzheim (1987), Eintracht Frankfurt (А) (1987—1988), Viktoria Sindlingen (1988—1989), Rot-Weiss Frankfurt (1989—1990).

В футбольном клубе «Майнц 05» Клопп выступал с 1990 по 2001, провёл 325 матчей во второй бундеслиге, что является рекордом для этой лиги. Клопп является автором 52 голов во второй бундеслиге, уступая в клубе только Свену Демандту (55). Кроме того, он — наряду с Беньямином Ауером, единственный игрок «Майнца 05», который забивал 4 мяча в одном матче второй бундеслиги (в 1991/92 в игре с FC Rot-Weiß Erfurt, счет 5:0).

Карьера тренера

Начиная с 28 февраля 2001 года, Клопп начал тренировать профессиональную команду «Майнц 05». Работа в клубе продлилась до 30 июня 2008 года. Клопп был назначен временным тренером, однако в результате отличной работы контракт был продлён. В течение следующих лет главный тренер Клопп вывел клуб на вершину таблицы. В 2002 и 2003 команда Клоппа упустила возможность выхода в первую бундеслигу, занимая два года подряд четвёртое место в таблице. С третьей попытки 23 мая 2004, заняв в таблице третье место, выход в первую лигу был оформлен, где его команда в следующем сезоне 2004/05 закрепилась на 11 месте.

До начала сезона 2005/06 Юрген Клопп с «Майнцем 05» испытали самый большой успех в истории клуба, когда его команда попала в квалификацию Кубка УЕФА, благодаря программе UEFA-Fair-Play. Дальше жителям Майнца было гарантировано попадание в первый круг соревнования кубка УЕФА в 2005/06 после игр с «FK Mika Aschtarak» (Армения, 4:0 и 0:0), а также против «ÍB Keflavík» (Исландия, 2:0 и 2:0), где команда Клоппа проиграла прошлогоднему победителю Кубка УЕФА ФК «Севилья» (0:0 и 0:2). В 2007 году Клопп с «Майнцем» снова вылетел во Вторую бундеслигу.

В апреле 2008 года Юрген Клопп сообщил, что не продлит его истекающий контракт, в случае невыхода футбольного клуба «Майнц 05» в первую бундеслигу. В последний игровой день сезона 2007/08 футбольный клуб упустил возможность выхода в первую бундеслигу, так Юрген Клопп закончил свою деятельность в качестве тренера в «Майнце» к 30 июня 2008.

С 1 июля 2008 Клопп начал тренировать клуб первой бундеслиги «Боруссия» из Дортмунда и достиг в его первом сезоне 6-го места и снова упустил в последнем туре возможность, на этот раз возможность попадания в Кубок УЕФА. Во второй сезон 2009/10 квалификация в Кубок УЕФА удалась, как следствие — продление договора до лета 2012. Сезоны 2010—2011 и 2011—2012 стали триумфальными для Клоппа: «Боруссия» убедительно стала чемпионом, показав содержательную и красивую игру.

Эксперт на футбольных передачах

Между 2005 и 2008 годами Клопп наряду с его тренерской деятельностью работал в качестве эксперта на футбольных передачах по Второму Германскому телевидению (ZDF) совместно с Йоханнесом Б. Кернером, Урсом Майером и Францем Беккенбауэром. В том числе он анализировал матчи чемпионата мира в 2006 и чемпионата Европы в 2008 году.

При этом он много работал с электронным «столом тактики». Вместе с тем он анализировал игровые сцены, указывал при помощи виртуальных маркировок на тактические ошибки в построении и иллюстрировал, как из этого следовали опасные атаки или голы. Эта методика была нова для немецкого телевидения; в результате данной работы Клопп, вместе с Кернером и Майером, получил 20 октября 2006 года награду немецкого телевидения в категории «Лучшая спортивная передача».

Во время чемпионата мира в 2010 году Юрген Клопп снова работал в качестве эксперта на футбольных передачах RTL.

Личная жизнь

Юрген Клопп состоит в браке во второй раз, имеет сына. Его жена имеет сына от предыдущего брака. Летом 2009 Клопп сменил свое прежнее местожительство город Unna на город Хердекке, где проживает большая часть игроков «Боруссии».

Достижения

Как тренер

Командные
Флаг Германии «Боруссия» (Дортмунд)
  • Обладатель Суперкубка Германии (1): 2008
  • Чемпион Германии (2): 2010/11, 2011/12
  • Обладатель Кубка Германии (1): 2011/2012
Личные
  • Лучший спортивный эксперт года (HERBERT-Award) (3): 2007, 2009, 2011
  • Футбольный тренер года в Германии (2): 2011, 2012

Тренерская статистика

Ссылки

  • http://www.bvb.de/?%81%9D%5C%1B%E7%F4%9D%2Ao%E3%87%9A
  • http://www.kicker.de/news/fussball/bundesliga/startseite/artikel/506079/

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Юрген Норберт Клопп — Jürgen Norbert Klopp; род. 16 июня 1967, Штутгарт, ФРГ) — немецкий футболист, ныне главный тренер английского клуба «Ливерпуль». Получил признание во время работы в футбольном клубе «Майнц 05», где играл с 1990 по 2001 и вслед за этим тренировал команду с 2001 по 2008 год. В 2008—2015 годах тренировал команду первой немецкой Бундеслиги «Боруссия» Дортмунд, с которой стал чемпионом Германии в сезонах 2010/11 и 2011/12, обладателем кубка Германии в сезоне 2011/12, финалистом Лиги чемпионов (2013) и обладателем Суперкубка Германии 2013 и 2014 годов.

Будучи действующим игроком, закончил учёбу в университете Франкфурта, где обучался по специальности «спортивный учёный». Написал свою дипломную работу на тему ходьбы. После Клопп, который на этот момент владел только лицензией тренера категории A, получил лицензию профессионального футбольного тренера в спортивном институте Кельна

Достижения

Флаг Германии «Боруссия (Дортмунд)»

Чемпион Чемпион Германии (2): 2010/11, 2011/12

Чемпион Обладатель Кубка Германии: 2011/12

Чемпион Обладатель Суперкубка Германии (2): 2013, 2014

Личные

Лучший спортивный эксперт года (HERBERT-Award) (3): 2007, 2009, 2011

Футбольный тренер года в Германии (2): 2011, 2012

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